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Short Stories: Where To Publish

Short stories are in plentiful demand. They fill a void in the market when long stories or books are too much to handle.

As an author short stories are a great way to hone your writing skills. They give an author additional exposure into the market and can supplement their income in between larger works. But where does an author go to submit his or her works.

Here’s a list of 50+ places I’ve complied from credible literary sources on where you should publish your short stories.

Short Stories – where you should publish

(sourced via Writer Life)

1. The New Yorker

Might as well start with a bang, right? Adding publication in The New Yorker to your portfolio puts you in a whole new league, though it won’t be easy. Author David. B. Comfort calculated the odds of an acceptance at 0.0000416 percent!

It accepts both standard short fiction as well as humorous short fiction for the “Shouts & Murmurs” section. No word counts are mentioned, though a quick scan of the column shows most pieces are 600 to 1,000 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.newyorker.com/about/contact

Deadline: Open

Payment: Huge bragging rights; pay for unsolicited submissions isn’t specified. Who Pays Writers lists several paid pieces, though as of this post’s publication, no rates specifically for short stories.

2. The Atlantic

Another highly respected magazine, The Atlantic publishes both big names and emerging writers in fiction and nonfiction. Submission guidelines advise, “A general familiarity with what we have published in the past is the best guide to what we’re looking for.”

Submission Guidelines: http://www.theatlantic.com/faq/#Submissions

Deadline: Open

Payment: Unsolicited submissions are generally unpaid, although if the editors choose your piece for online content, you may receive $100-$200 depending on genre and length.

3. The Threepenny Review

This quarterly arts magazine focuses on literature, arts and society, memoir and essay. Short stories should be no more than 4,000 words, while submissions to the “Table Talk” section (pithy, irreverent and humorous musings on culture, art, politics and life) should be 1,000 words or less.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.threepennyreview.com/submissions.html

Deadline: January to June

Payment: $400 for short stories; $200 for Table Talk pieces

4. Zoetrope: All-Story

Founded by Francis Ford Coppola and Adrienne Brodeur in 1997, Zoetrope: All-Story’s mission is “to explore the intersection of story and art, fiction and film” and “form a bridge to storytellers at large, encouraging them to work in the natural format of a short story.” Submissions should be no more than 7,000 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.all-story.com/submissions.cgi

Deadline: Open

Payment: None, but this magazine has discovered many emerging writers and published big names like Salman Rushdie and Gabriel García Márquez, so publication here could win you some serious prestige points.

5. One Story

One Story is just what the name says: a literary magazine that publishes one great short story every three to four weeks, and nothing more.

Its main criteria for a great short story? One “that leaves readers feeling satisfied and [is] strong enough to stand alone.” Stories can be any style or subject but should be between 3,000 and 8,000 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.one-story.com/index.php?page=submit

Deadline: September 1 to May 31

Payment: $500 plus 25 contributor copies

6. The Antioch Review

The Antioch Review rarely publishes more than three short stories per issue, but its editors are open to new as well as established writers. Authors published here often wind up in Best American anthologies and as the recipients of Pushcart prizes.

To make the cut, editors say, “It is the story that counts, a story worthy of the serious attention of the intelligent reader, a story that is compelling, written with distinction.” Word count is flexible, but pieces tend to be under 5,000.

Submission Guidelines: http://review.antiochcollege.org/guidelines

Deadline: Open except for the period of June 1 to September 1

Payment: $20 per printed page plus two contributor copies

More Short Stories Publications? Ok you asked for it…

7. AGNI

Thought-provoking is the name of the game if you want to get published in AGNI. Its editors look for pieces that hold a mirror up to the world around us and engage in a larger, ongoing cultural conversation about nature, mankind, the society we live in and more.

There are no word limits, but shorter is generally better; “The longer a piece is, the better it needs to be to justify taking up so much space in the magazine,” note the submission guidelines.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.bu.edu/agni/submit.html

Deadline: Open September 1 to May 31

Payment: $10 per printed page (up to a max of $150) plus a year’s subscription, two contributor’s copies and four gift copies

8. Barrelhouse

Published by an independent nonprofit literary organization, Barrelhouse’s biannual print journal  and online issue seek to “bridge the gap between serious art and pop culture.” Its editors look for quality writing that’s also edgy and funny — as they say, they “want to be your weird Internet friend.”

There’s no hard word count, but try to keep your submission under 8,000 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.barrelhousemag.com/submissions

Deadline: Currently open for books, comics, and a few other categories. Check the webpage to see all open categories and sign up for the newsletter to learn as soon as new open categories are announced.

Payment: $50 plus two contributor copies (print journal); unpaid (online issue)

9. Cincinnati Review

The Cincinnati Review publishes work by writers of all genres and at all points of their careers. Its editors want “work that has energy,” that is “rich in language and plot structure” and “that’s not just ecstatic, but that makes is reader feel ecstatic, too.”

Fiction and nonfiction submissions should be no more than 40 double-spaced pages.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.cincinnatireview.com/#/submissions/guidelines

Deadline: August 15 to March 15

Payment: $25 per double-spaced page

10. The First Line

This cool quarterly is all about jumpstarting that pesky writer’s block. Each issue contains short fiction stories (300-5,000 words) that each begin with the same pre-assigned first line. You can also write a nonfiction critical essay (500-800 words) about your favorite first line from a piece of literary work.

If you really want to get ambitious, you can also write a four-part story that uses each of that year’s first lines (which is due by the next year’s spring issue deadline). To find each issue’s assigned first line, check out the submission guidelines below.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.thefirstline.com/submission.htm

Deadline: February 1 (spring); May 1 (summer); August 1 (fall); November 1 (winter)

Payment: $25 to $50 (fiction); $25 (nonfiction) plus a contributor’s copy

11. The Georgia Review

Another one high on the prestige list, The Georgia Review features a wide variety of essays, fiction, book reviews and more across a wide range of topics. You can read specific requirements for each in the submission guidelines below, but the common theme among them all is quality, quality, quality.

Bear in mind submitting requires a $3 processing fee if you’re not a subscriber.

Submission Guidelines: http://garev.uga.edu/submissions.html

Deadline: Open except for the period of May 15 to August 15

Payment: $50 per printed page

12. Boulevard Magazine

Boulevard Magazine is always on the lookout for “less experienced or unpublished writers with exceptional promise.” It accepts prose pieces (fiction and nonfiction) up to 8,000 words (note: no science fiction, erotica, westerns, horror, romance or children’s stories).

There is a submission fee of $3.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.boulevardmagazine.org/guidelines/

Deadline: Open October 1 to May 1

Payment: $100 to $300

13. Camera Obscura

Camera Obscura is a biannual independent literary journal that publishes contemporary literary fiction and photography. Fiction should be between 250 and 8,000 words, although its editors have made exceptions for the occasional “exceptional novella” between 12,000 and 30,000 words.

You can also try your hand at a “Bridge the Gap” piece, where you review the current photo gallery and construct a story that “Takes the reader on an unexpected journey from the first image to the next.”

Submission Guidelines: http://www.obscurajournal.com/guidelines.php

Deadline: Stay tuned to the guidelines page to find out when the next deadline is announced.

Payment: $1,000 to one featured writer published in each issue, as determined by the editors; all other contributors receive two copies of the issue in which they are published. The best Bridge the Gap piece receives $50.

14. Crazyhorse

Open to a wide variety of fiction from mainstream to avant-garde, Crazyhorse puts no limitations on style or form. If you’ve got something people haven’t seen before and won’t be able to forget, its editors are looking for it.

Crazyhorse also accepts nonfiction of any sort, including memoirs, journal entries, obituaries, etc. — we told you it’s open to anything! Keep your word count between 2,500 and 8,500 words.

Submission Guidelines: http://crazyhorse.cofc.edu/submit/

Deadline: Open for submissions from September 1 to May 31, except for the month of January (when it only accepts entries for the Crazyhorse Prizes)

Payment: $20 per printed page (up to a max of $200)

15. Story

Story Magazine is, you guessed it, all about the story, whatever shape it takes. Each issue is based around a theme, but its editors encourage writers to think outside the box when it comes to how to address that theme — fiction, nonfiction, hybrid forms, “hermit-crab essays” and more are all up for consideration.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.storymagazine.org/submit/

Deadline: Open January 1 to May 1 (print magazine); open February, April, June, August, and October (online)

Payment: Not specified

So you want more places to submit your short stories? Here you go….

16. Vestal Review

Prefer to keep your short stories extremely short? Vestal Review publishes flash fiction of no more than 500 words. Its editors are open to all genres except for syrupy romance, hard science fiction and children’s stories, and they have a special fondness for humor. R-rated content is OK, but stay away from anything too racy, gory or obscene.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.vestalreview.org/guidelines/

Deadline:  Submission periods are February to May and August to November

Payment: Ten cents per word (for stories up to 100 words); five cents per word (101-200 words); three cents per word (201-500 words). “Stories of great merit” in their estimation can receive up to a $25 flat fee.

17. Flash Fiction Online

Flash Fiction Online allows for slightly longer flash stories — between 500 and 1,000 words. Its editors like sci-fi and fantasy but are open to all genres. As with Vestal, stay away from the heavier stuff like erotica and violence. As of March 1, 2015, FFO accepts previously published works.

Submission Guidelines: http://flashfictiononline.com/main/submission-guidelines/

Deadline: Open

Payment: $60 per story, two cents per word for reprints

18. Black Warrior Review

Black Warrior Review publishes a mix of work by up-and-coming writers and nationally known names. Fiction pieces of up to 7,000 words should be innovative, challenging and unique; its editors value “absurdity, hybridity, the magical [and] the stark.”

BWR also accepts flash fiction under 1,000 words and nonfiction pieces (up to 7,000 words) that examine and challenge beliefs and boundaries. There is a $3 submission fee.

Submission Guidelines: http://bwr.ua.edu/submit/guidelines/

Deadline: Submission periods are December 1 to March 1 and June 1 to September 1

Payment: A one-year subscription to BWR and a nominal lump-sum fee (amount not disclosed in its guidelines)

19. The Sun Magazine

The Sun Magazine offers some of the biggest payments we’ve seen, and while its guidelines specifically mention personal writing and provocative political/cultural pieces, they also say editors are “open to just about anything.”

Works should run no more than 7,000 words. Submit something the editors love, and you could get a nice payday.

Submission Guidelines: http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing

Deadline: Open

Payment: A one-year subscription plus $300 to $2,000 (nonfiction) or $300 to $1,500 (fiction)

20. Virginia Quarterly (VQR)

A diverse publication that features both award-winning and emerging writers, VQR accepts short fiction (2,000 to 8,000 words) but is not a fan of genre work like romance, sci-fi, etc. It also takes nonfiction (3,500 to 9,000 words) like travel essays that examine the world around us.

Submission Guidelines: http://www.vqronline.org/about-vqr/submissions

Deadline: Submission periods are June 15 to July 31 and October 1 to November 15. VQR also accepts nonfiction pitches from June 15 to December 1.

Payment: Generally $1,000 and above for short fiction and prose (approximately 25 cents per word) with higher rates for investigative reporting; $100 to $200 for content published online.

21. Ploughshares

Ploughshares’ award-winning literary journal is published by Boston’s Emerson College. They accept fiction and nonfiction under 6,000 words and require a $3 service fee if you submit online (it’s free to submit by mail, though they prefer digital submissions).

Submission Guidelines: https://www.pshares.org/submit/journal/guidelines

Deadline: June 1 at noon EST through January 15 at noon EST

Payment: $25 per printed page (for a minimum of $50 per title and a maximum of $250 per author).

22. Shimmer

Shimmer “encourages authors of all backgrounds to write stories that include characters and settings as diverse and wondrous as the people and places of the world we live in.”

Traditional sci-fi and fantasy need not apply; Shimmer’s editors are after contemporary fantasy and “speculative fiction” with strong plots, characters and emotional core — the more unique the better. Keep your stories under 7,500 words (4,000 words is around the sweet spot).

Submission Guidelines: http://www.shimmerzine.com/guidelines/fiction-guidelines/

Deadline: Opens for submissions on September 4

Payment: Five cents per word (for a minimum of $50)

23. Daily Science Fiction

Sci-fi and fantasy writers, this one’s for you. Daily Science Fiction is looking for character-driven fiction, and the shorter, the better. While their word count range is 100 to 1,500 words, they’re especially eager to get flash fiction series (several flash stories based around a central theme), science fiction, fantasy, and slipstream.

Submission Guidelines: http://dailysciencefiction.com/submit

Deadline: Open except for the period between December 24 to January 2

Payment: Eight cents per word, with the possibility of additional pay for reprints in themed Daily Science Fiction anthologies

Still need more places to submit your short stories? Try these

(thanks to Jacqui Bennett Writers Bureau UK)

Aesthetica The UK’s cultural arts magazine that features writing, art, music and film. It reports on the arts and publishes features, interviews, news, articles and reviews that stir the imagination around current themes.  Website: www.aestheticamagazine.com

Analog Science Fiction and Fact (http://www.analogsf.com) is one of the world’s leading sci-fi magazines. Published eleven times a year in paperback format, editor Stanley Schmidt chooses fiction and articles that demonstrate a sound understanding of science and an imaginative vision of possible scientific futures. Contact: Analog Science Fiction and Fact, 475 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016-6901, USA.

Any Dream Will Do Review Dr. Jean M. Bradt, publisher and chief editor of the Any Dream Will Do Review, has created a new story genre, Fiction in the Raw, and she seeks new or accomplished authors who wish to try writing in this genre. Fiction in the Raw is fiction that contains raw emotions (not raw sex, which will be rejected). Writers of Fiction in the Raw are unique in that they are not afraid to honestly expose their own deepest emotions. Can you meet this challenge? See website for submission guidelines: http://willigocrazy.org/Ch09a.htm

Aquila Dedicated to encouraging children aged 8-13 to reason and create, and to develop a caring nature. Short stories and serials of up to 4 parts. Occasional features commissioned from writers with specialist knowledge. Approach in writing with ideas and sample of writing style, with sae. Length: 700-800 words (features), 1000-1100 words (stories or per episode of a serial). Illustrations: colour and b&w, cartoons. Payment: £75 (features); £90 (stories), £80 (per episode). Jackie Berry, New Leaf Publishing Ltd, PO Box 2518, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2BB. Tel: 01323 431313. Fax: 01323 731136. Email: info@aquila.co.uk Website: www.aquila.co.uk

The Artillery of Words A new online magazine to showcase budding writers. All submissions are welcome – anything from poems to short stories and fiction to non-fiction. Plays and children’s literature are also welcome – the word limit is 1,500. Website: http://theartilleryofwords.weebly.com

Black Gate Magazine is looking for submissions of adventure-oriented fantasy fiction suitable for all ages, including urban fantasy, sword and sorcery, dark fantasy/horror, romantic fantasy. Pays six cents a word for up to 7,000 words, $420 for 7,000-14,000 words, and three cents a word for longer works; buys First North American serial and electronic publication rights. Guidelines: submissions@blackgate.com or the website (www.blackgate.com). Editor: John O’Neill with New Epoch Press, Attn: Submissions Dept, 815 Oak Street, St Charles, IL 60174, USA.

Bloodlust UK Vampire fiction. Details: http://www.bloodlust-uk.com

Carillon Magazine Stories, articles, fillers (maximum 1,400 words). Quality work only. Website: http://www.carillonmag.org.uk/index.html

Chapman Scotland’s quality literary magazine. Features poetry, short works of fiction, criticism, reviews and articles on theatre, politics, language and the arts. Unsolicited material welcome if accompanied by s.a.e. Approach in writing unless discussion is needed. Priority is given to full-time writers. Features: Topics of literary interest, especially Scottish literature, theatre, culture or politics. Maximum 5000 words. Fiction: Short stories, occasionally novel extracts if self-contained. Maximum 6000 words. Special Pages: Poetry, both UK and non-UK in translation (mainly, but not necessarily, European). Payment by negotiation. Editor: Joy M. Hendry, 4 Broughton Place, Edinburgh EH1 3RX. Tel: 0131 557 2207. Fax: 0131 556 9565 Email: editor@chapman-pub.co.uk. Website: www.chapman-pub.co.uk

Countryside Tales Your story can be in any genre as long as it has a ‘countryside’ feel or setting. For example, you could write a crime story about a village policeman or a romantic tale set in the country. Your story should contain interesting and believable characters and have a beginning, middle and satisfactory conclusion. If there is a ‘twist in the tale’, it should not be obvious.Fiction, poetry, articles, writing competitions. New writers encouraged. Details: Countryside Tales, Park Publications, 14 The Park, Stow on the Wold, Cheltenham, Glos GL54 1DX; contact editor David Howarth (tel: 01451 831053) to discuss ideas, or send sae for guidelines. Email: enquiries@parkpublications.co.uk Website: www.parkpublications.co.uk

Crystal, The Magazine for Writers Stories (true and fiction), poems, articles, fillers. No bad language or erotica. Regular features: writing with flair, wordsmithing, readers’ letters, competitions. Occasionally Subscribers’ News and Advertising. One sample copy free. Visit website for details.

Dark Tales Created as an outlet primarily for unpublished writers of sci-fi, dark fantasy and horror short stories. Published stories are the winners and shortlisted entries from a quarterly competition. Fiction should be strong on characterisation as well as original, thought-provoking ideas.   Website: http://www.darktales.co.uk

Descant An established, Canadian literary magazine. Descant considers submissions of poetry (submit about six poems), short stories, novel excerpts, plays, essays, interviews, musical scores and visual presentations. Standards for acceptance are high. They receive a large number of submissions every month – please send only your best, carefully edited work. No submission may be under consideration by another publisher, nor can it have been previously published. Please note that it can take up to 12 months to hear back regarding your submission. More information on the website (http://www.descant.ca). Submission Guidelines: http://www.descant.ca/submit.html

The Edge Wants modern/psychological/urban/imaginative science fiction/horror/crime/erotic fiction. Enclose sae/IRCs. No reprints or email submissions. Editor: Dave Clark, Unit 138, 22 Notting Hill Gate, London, W11 3JE. Website: www.theedge.abelgratis.co.uk

Every Day Fiction Every day, we publish a new flash fiction story (1000 words or fewer), perfect for your coffee break, your commute, or whenever you have a few minutes for yourself. The maximum 1000 word count is firm. We pay $3 US per story, plus an additional $1 US if the story is selected for our annual print anthology. Details: http://www.everydayfiction.com

Fleeting Magazine ‘The Best Short Writing in the World’ – competitions, photography, et cetera. Website: http://fleetingmagazine.com

Historical Novel Society See Solander below.

Interzone: Science Fiction & Fantasy Unsolicited mss welcome ‘from writers who have a knowledge of the magazine and its contents’. Website: http://ttapress.com/interzone

Irish Pages is a biannual journal, edited in Belfast and publishing, in equal measure, writing from Ireland and overseas. Its policy is to publish poetry, short fiction, essays, creative non-fiction, memoir, essay reviews, nature-writing, translated work, literary journalism, and other autobiographical, historical, religious and scientific writing of literary distinction. There are no standard reviews or narrowly academic articles. http://www.irishpages.org/

Ken*again, the literary magazine A quarterly, nonprofit e-zine presenting a hearty, eclectic mix of prose, poetry, art and photography: accessible, obscure, soothing, disturbing. We do not pay cash but we publish authors’ bios and often link to their sites. Prose and poetry may be sent either in the body of an email or by attaching MS-Word Documents. Art should be attached in jpg format or we should be directed to Artists’ and Photographers’ websites. Edited and Published by John Delin and Pamela Boslet Buskin. Website: http://kenagain.freeservers.com Guidelines: http://kenagain.freeservers.com/contact.html

The Lady Not currently accepting unsolicited short stories. Website: http://www.lady.co.uk/

Mslexia Women writers’ magazine – always with plenty going on. Frequent competitions. Highly recommended. Submissions to: Mslexia, PO Box 656, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE99 1PZ; tel: 0191 233 3860; e-mail (for information only, no submissions):postbag@mslexia.co.uk Website: www.mslexia.co.uk

My Weekly Check latest edition of magazine for submission details.

New Welsh Review Welsh literary magazine in the English language. Welcomes material of literary and cultural interest to Welsh readers and those with an interest in Wales. Website: http://www.newwelshreview.com

The People’s Friend Entertaining, optimistic stories are required by this publication – throw in a touch of nostalgia and let your fictional world move more slowly than today’s and you’ll stand a far better chance of succeeding. Stories should usually be between 1,000 and 4,000 words, but there are occasionally slots for shorter pieces of 500 to 1,000 words.. Website: http://www.thepeoplesfriend.co.uk/

Prole is a new publication that focuses on accessible poetry, short fiction and creative nonfiction. We aim to publish three times a year. If money is made, contributors will be paid a share. Website: http://www.prolebooks.co.uk/index.html

Riptide New short fiction by both established and emerging writers. We are committed to providing a forum for high quality, innovative fiction, expanding the readership of the short story genre and enhancing its standing. We invite work by prominent authors who believe in the continuing importance of the short story, but we aim to include new voices in every issue. Details: http://www.riptidejournal.co.uk

Scribble Quarterly short story magazine now in its seventh year of publication. Offers prizes of cash prizes for the best three stories in each issue of the magazine, on any subject, up to 3,000 words. Details and guidelines: Send sae to: Scribble, Park Publications, 14 The Park, Stow on the Wold, Glos GL54 1DX. Website: www.parkpublications.co.uk

Sniplits publish short stories of up to 9,000 words in audio. Website:http://www.sniplits.com.   Guidelines and submissions calendar in Authors Room.

Solander Payments are being offered for publication in the Historical Novel Society’s magazine, Solander. Many contributors published in Solander have found agents and gone on to further success. Any theme or period is acceptable, and the editor is prepared to read time-slip or alternative history as well as ‘straight’ historical fiction. All genres will be considered and submissions are not restricted to members, although contributors should read a copy of the magazine first. Membership Details on Website: http://www.historicalnovelsociety.org/main.htm

Spec Magazine A Canadian magazine seeks fantasy, horror, ghost and fairy stories; both poetry and prose. Guidelines and pay rates: http://www.onspec.ca/ or contact Spec Magazine, Box 4727, Edmonton Alberta, Canada T6E 5G6.

Stickman Review (www.stickmanreview.com) is an online literary magazine published twice yearly. Editors Anthony Brown and Darrin English welcome e-mail submissions of literary fiction (fiction@stickmanreview.com), non-fiction (nonfiction@stickmanre view.com) and poetry (poetry@stickmanreview.com). Although they do not rule out genre stories, the editors emphasise that this is a literary magazine, and their major interest is the quality of the literary style. Contact: Stickman Review, 2890 N. Fairview Dr, Flagstaff, Arizona 86004, USA.

The Strand Magazine is a quarterly print publication offering a variety of crime short stories, book reviews, articles on the mystery genre, and interviews with prominent authors or people with a decided ‘criminal’ interest. Managing Editor Andrew F Gulli looks for tales written in the best traditions of the classic writers. Weave a mystery, sprinkle it with red herrings, and introduce characters with whom the reader can sympathise. Explicit sex or violence are not welcome. Stories of 2,000 to 6,000 words should be submitted by mail to: The Strand Magazine, PO Box 1418, Birmingham, MI 48012-1418, USA. Website: http://www.strandmag.com/

Tin House (http://www.tinhouse.com/) is a quarterly literary magazine that publishes fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. It accepts submissions from around the world. Non-fiction articles include interviews with literary figures and essays on writing and literature. Pays from $200 for short stories and $50 for poetry. Contact: Tin House, PO Box 10500, Portland, Oregon OR 97296-0500, USA for further information (enclose sae and IRC), or visit the website for fuller guidelines.

Ulster Tatler Articles of local interest and social functions appealing to Northern Ireland’s ABC1 population. Welcomes unsolicited material; approach by phone or in writing in the first instance. Fiction: Max. 3000 words. Payment £150. Editor: Richard Sherry, 39 Boucher Road, Belfast BT12 6UT. Tel: 01232 681371. Fax: 01232 381915 Email: ulstertat@aol.com Website: http://www.ulstertatler.com

Vintage Script is looking for short stories and articles that are original and well-written, and must be on an historical theme. Short stories and longer articles should be no longer than 2,000 words. Also interested in shorter articles of 500-1,000 words. Contributions should not have been published elsewhere. Look at the Submissions page on the website if you have a historical story or article to share. Website: http://www.vintagescript.co.uk/

Woman’s Weekly Full submission guidelines: http://www.goodtoknow.co.uk/family/471247/woman-s-weekly-fiction-guidelines

Woman’s Weekly Fiction Special See previous entry.

Yours A fortnightly magazine covering general women’s interest and lifestyle. Aimed at readers over fifty. Publishes general interest short fiction. Website: http://www.yours.co.uk Email: yours@emap.com Features Editor: Caroline Chadderton, Bretton Court, Bretton, Peterborough, PE3 8DZ

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